Dude, I Could So Go for a Euro Right Now

by flaunt

Young London Fashion’s Pen and Think

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Awon Golding

Awon Golding makes fantastical modern couture millinery. She creates two seasonal collections a year and private commissions for very lucky clients. Her hats made their U.S. television debut on none other than the Rich Kids of Beverly Hills. How CALIFUK is that?

What’s your favorite material to work with? Why?

I love working with feathers, they’re the most versatile material in a milliner’s repertoire. They can look rigid and sharp or convey weightlessness and soft lines. My S/S16 collection is themed on the American naturalist and illustrator John James Audubon’s book Birds of America so expect to see loads of feathers.

How many seasons have you been designing for?

My first proper collection was S/S14 so I’m coming into my third year as a fully-fledged millinery brand. After graduating from college five years ago I went to work for an accessories design firm for a couple of years designing for high street brands such as Topshop and River Island. That commercial experience was a great foundation for starting my own business.

What are your most important rituals during your workday?

This makes me sound totally English but that first cup of tea in the morning is heaven. There’s something about facing the day with a steaming cuppa in your hand, you can do anything!

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Danielle Romeril

The poster “Danielle Romeril” girl is nonchalant, feminine, and slightly off-kilter, just like the NEWGEN recipient herself. Once known as ‘Rainbow Bright,’ Danielle Romeril started sewing to create outfits for raves. Shaking off the glitter and neon of her former rave days, her eponymous A/W15 collection showcases Romeril’s masterful use of an ancient Japanese Samurai armor technique to weave hem details on apocalyptic inspired pieces. These ingenious techniques, and refreshingly feminine—but not fussy—designs have caught the eyes of stockists at the Dover Street Market, and Matches Fashion.

Have you ever given yourself a fashion related injury? Was it worth it? 

I have stitched my finger into an industrial knitting machine—it was crazy painful. I have burnt myself countless times on the industrial irons and developed an allergy to goats milk from overdosing on goats cheese while working in Paris.

Where’s your favorite place to go in London on a day off? 

Victoria Park—I live near lots of designer friends and on the weekend we head there for a nighttime picnic and a few beers. I like to spend the daytime at Columbia Road Flower Market, exploring the canals on foot, or if there is a good exhibition on at the White Cube gallery in Bermondsey, I will head there.

Would you rather have pineapples for hands, or only be able to eat nothing but pineapple for the rest of your life? 

Eat nothing but pineapple for the rest of my life! It would be hell but what could I do with pineapples for hands?

If you could change one thing about London, what would it be? 

I would make it a smaller city—more compact—more like a series of neighbourhoods. I would put restrictions on property ownership for people who do not live in the country—the crazy rents and house prices are being fuelled be property investors from around the world and it is driving artists and designers out of the city.

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Diego Vanassibara

Diego Vanassibara has an enviable stocklist around the world from L’Eclaireur and LuisaViaRoma in Europe, to Joyce in Hong Kong, and H. Lorenzo in Los Angeles. Hailed as one of the most promising names in the London menswear scene, Vanassibara is Brazilian by birth and has lived in London for 10 years since studying at Cordwainers at London College of Fashion. His signature: hand-carved wooden details crafted by artisans from Java, and a shoe style called “hybrid” that’s a cross between the Oxford and the Derby.

Have you ever given yourself a fashion related injury? Was it worth it? 

Yes, many. I’m always slicing a beef out of my hands! Making shoes is tough. I hope it’s worth it; for the craft, all for the craft.

At what time of day are you most creative? 

Usually late at night, possibly when I lay down in bed.

If you had unlimited money and time what would you make? 

I would build orphanages and give the best education to as many children as possible. And then I would set up the most incredible factory and hire the most skilled shoemakers on the planet to consistently make the greatest possible shoes.

What song have you had stuck in your head this week? 

I always have samba de enredo in my head, everyday. It is the type of song produced by the schools of samba in Brazil.

If you could change one thing about London, what would it be? 

I would build many more high rises. Many people don’t fancy living in a house, I don’t. London urgently needs to solve its housing and space problem and it should start by growing upwards and quickly.

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KÉJI

Katie Green, a former contributor to Love Magazine and buyer at Net-a-Porter debuts Kéji—an all denim collection. Green takes the material back to its utilitarian roots and updates it with Japanese influenced minimalism. Envisioned as an update to the humble fabric’s origins as a work uniform, Kéji pieces are meant to be functional everyday wear, yet make a subtle but noticeable statement through their playful redesign of denim.

Have you ever given yourself a fashion related injury? Was it worth it?

Over the years I’ve chipped both of my front teeth biting on needles while hand sewing. Not really worth it, no.

How many seasons have you been designing for?

S/S16 will be KÉJI’s second season, exciting!

Where’s your favorite place to go in London on a day off?

One of my all time favorite places in London has to be the Barbican.

What are your most important rituals during your workday?

With KÉJI at its early stages, each day is vastly different to the next. I think it’s important to pause for a few minutes, have a cup of tea and reflect.

At what time of day are you most creative?

I’m a night owl; I love that quiet time when everyone else is sleeping.

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Molly Goddard

Molly Goddard reminds one that it is so much fun to be a girl. A London native, Goddard studied Fashion Knit at Central Saint Martins. Her A/W15 presentation reimagined ’50s British art students, sketching a naked man, while wearing glamorous ball gowns that had all been hand-finished on a vintage smocking machine. Goddard’s previous capsule collection for ASOS was based around Barbie and the Spice Girls. Fab. She’s taken over Dover Street Market’s window displays, and continues to soar. Well, her girl is a girl we all wish to be.

Where do you go for inspiration? 

I always visit the library at Central Saint Martins and London College of Fashion, I can spend days in there speeding through volumes and volumes of magazines, photography, fashion, and textile books. I also look a lot at vintage clothes, there are loads of great shops and markets around London, looking at the way old clothes are made is fascinating. A massive amount more time and care was taken with how things were constructed and made—even cheap things.

What other designers have you worked for?

I have done internships at Giles Deacon, John Galliano and Meadham Kirchhoff.

What tool do you use the most in your studio?

My smocking machines, they are old machines which take a lot of work to set up and then they gather fabric beautifully! You need lots of thread, a pole to roll the fabric on and lots of patience. One meter of fabric turns into ten centimeters.

What are your most important rituals during your workday?

We always have a proper sit down lunch and talk, I think it’s very important to have a break and talk about things other than fashion for a while.

Would you rather have pineapples for hands, or only be able to eat nothing but pineapple for the rest of your life?

Ahhh this is the kind of question we ask at the studio, I am a bit allergic to pineapples and couldn’t do anything if they were my hands but I would miss other food too much so maybe I would have pineapples for hands! And hope I had some good friends and assistants.

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Phoebe English

The dream of the fisherman’s wife is a wardrobe created by Phoebe English—specifically, her A/W15 line which features dark and diaphanous organza fishnet, contrasted with heavy draping to create a look that is English’s signature: painstakingly crafted, dark, and dreamy. Proudly made in England, much of her material is sourced within her native country. Cult fans of English’s hand-woven, and meticulously constructed garments can look forward to the debut of her menswear line in 2016.

How many seasons have you been designing for?

Our S/S16 show this September will be our 10th.

Where’s your favorite place to go in London on a day off?

The V and A Museum will never stop being the best place in the whole city to me.

What’s your favorite tool in your studio?

The rag-rug hook—it has infinite uses!

If you could change one thing about London, what would it be?

Its expense and its dreadful awful conservative politics.

If your house was burning down and you could only retrieve one object, what would it be?

My black moor goldfish called Pig.

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Sadie Williams

Lurex-loving Sadie Williams’s designs are whimsical, folk-inspired, bold, and glittery. Williams has translated her playful designs into gowns for Barbie, and a chevron-motif capsule collection for & Other Stories, which sold internationally. Her A/W15 Ikebana collection is inspired by the Japanese art of flower arranging but is far from floral. Williams takes inspiration from creating interesting juxtapositions between material, colors, and negative space. Williams, a former Central Saint Martins graduate, creates standout statement clothes—for every girl except the wallflower.

Have you ever given yourself a fashion related injury? Was it worth it?

Yep! I was so tired a week before my CSM MA Graduate show, I tumbled down the stairs and split my knee bashing it against a huge wheely bag which tumbled down with me. So I went straight from the hospital where I was stitched to a meeting Louise Wilson had arranged that afternoon because I was too terrified not to turn up. But she promptly told me I was mad for turning up and to go home and get some rest!

What’s your favorite material to work with? Why?

Lurex! I love it. I love using various textile techniques to transform it from something quite cheap and tacky, into something a bit more elevated, special, modern, and cool.

What’s your favorite tool in your studio?

My heat press! I specialise in creating textiles using this and I’m always telling my interns it’s the best thing I ever bought!

What was the first thing you ever designed and why did you want to make that?

I made myself some strappy high heels out of cardboard and elastic when I was about seven because I wanted some so badly and wasn’t allowed them!

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Ashley Williams

NEWGEN recipient Ashley Williams’ collection is a mix of ’90s cartoon graphics stamped on an updated silhouette made for the modern Spice Girl. Inspired by Riot Grrrl Kathleen Hanna, and it-girl Chloë Sevigny, Williams creates skirts printed with a cartoon that reads “kick ass,” pink fur coats, and PVC dresses, that are more tongue-in-cheek than kitsch. Williams’ pop-influenced fashion is the girlgang uniform that has it-girls like Alexa Chung, Pixie Geldof, and Sarah Andelman under its spell.

Have you ever given yourself a fashion related injury? Was it worth it?

I was wearing these super high heels for a fancy dress party a few years ago, they were so uncomfortable that I had to walk home barefoot. It was a terrible idea in hindsight as I cut my foot, got an infection and had to take antibiotics for weeks!

Which designer is your biggest inspiration?

I’m a big fan of Stephen Sprouse, in particular his incredible use of graphics and strong silhouettes are a real inspiration.

Do you take any inspiration from L.A. designers? Who?

Jeremy Scott was the designer that really got me into fashion, rather than just clothes, I think he is great. I also really love Rodarte and the strong girl they design for.

Would you rather have pineapples for hands, or only be able to eat nothing but pineapple for the rest of your life?

Luckily I won’t ever need to make that decision, but if I had to I’d go for pineapple hands and become an artist teaching myself to paint with my feet.

At what time of day are you most creative?

I tend to get a lot of inspiration at night and my best ideas usually come around 2AM.

What’s the oldest piece of clothing you own?

I have a vintage cardigan that my dad brought for me when I was seven, it’s lilac with silk crochet—I still wear it today as a crop top!

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Martine Rose

Drawing inspiration from the underground elements of London’s nightlife, S&M and ’90s raves Martine Rose creates a menswear line that subverts traditional masculinity. Her S/S14 presentation had male models in long blonde wigs wearing tailored white pants and shirts, surrounded by rave flyers scattered on the floor. Her recent collaboration with streetwear line #BEENTRILL# is a polished version of ’90s JNCO jeans cinched at the waist, paired with skin-tight shirts.

What’s your favorite material to work with? Why?

I really enjoy working with cheap fabrics but treating them like they are beautiful luxury fabrics. I like a certain amount of tension and awkwardness in my collections and I get this by using surprising fabrics and treating them carefully. When they sit alongside the more classic fabrics there is a really interesting relationship that happens between them. I love fabrics that just sit on the line of “taste,” in fact I really like to play with notions of taste, frayed calico is just as beautiful as frayed silk.

What’s your favorite tool in your studio?

My pattern table (not strictly a tool I know), but it’s where the magic happens, that and my big blank wall that becomes filled at the start of each season.

What’s the oldest piece of clothing you own?

I have an original smiley Acid house T-shirt that I have had since I was nine. It’s another example of a “cheap” fabric taking on a different life, it is so washed and fragile now that it’s more delicate than anything else I own—I have to hand wash it in a pillow case! Now it’s become a luxury fabric to me.

What thing makes a style immortal?

The person wearing it I think, style is a living thing to me, and the person wearing it brings the style. Fashion is fashion and style is style, but the person brings the style to the fashion if that makes sense?

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