No More I Love Ewes

by flaunt

Hello Darling, It's Me, Your Weekly Revelations.

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//HE SLATHERED ME IN CREAM CHEESE AND TOLD ME I WAS BEAUTIFUL//

“It was 1998... I don’t remember what the shop was called, but I know that it was in the Meatpacking District. I got a plain bagel with lox cream cheese and then I walked to this park on Hudson and I ate it there,” Hanna Liden regales of her first bagel-devouring experience. It must have shifted something deep within her because 17 years on, the Swedish artist is responsible for the giant renditions of the cylindrical East Coast snack that having been popping up across NYC. The two-part installation will be on show at the Hudson River Park till October 20 and the Ruth Wittenberg Plaza till August 24.

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//THE HOTTEST B*TCH IN THE PLACE//

Along with artwork from his contemporaries, Brazilian native Abraham Palatnik will be showcasing a series of pieces from his W and Relevo Progressivo series, in turn featuring some severely blurred lines indeed. Transforming movement into metronomic form, the South-American artist’s delicate techniques use sections divided lengthwise with varying tones, applying "mathematical laws and creating a fluid effect.” The Galleria Nara Roesler in São Paulo will be home to the exhibition running from  August 3 to September 12. If you’re around those parts, it’s worth the dizzying visit.

//IF I DON’T RETAIN SOME INNOCENCE//

Formerly part of the four-piece punk outfit Abe Vigoda, Michael Vidal is currently creating a lush dream world of his own with the help of delay/reverb pedals and unmediated sincerity. His most recent single “Dreams (Come Back To Me)” evokes Fleetwood’s classics, but not simply because of the title or the bass line that saunters between subdominant and dominant. Vidal himself seems to harness some of the mystical femininity that has cloaked Nicks throughout her career. See Vidal perform this Saturday at the Smell with Tashaki Miyaki and So Many Wizards.

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//BYO GLASS BARBECUE//

If you weren’t already considering moving to Albuquerque, New Mexico, perhaps you could now be swayed. The Spanish style abode of Breaking Bad's Jesse Pinkman--the scene of many a diabolical house party, not to mention where Pinkman tried to disintegrate Krazy 8's cousin with acid resulting in a gaping hole in the upstairs floor--is now up for sale with an asking price of $1.6 million. The mother-daughter realty team responsible for the sale have created a website just so you know how famous (read: valuable) this place really is. They also insist the house wasn’t used to film any “intense” scenes. We beg to disagree.

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//NO MORTAL MAN//

There once was time when Kendrick Lamar was just like the rest of us. Actually, scratch that, there’s never been a time when Kendrick Lamar was like the rest of us, only a time before his ascent into the realm of Hip Hop royalty meant that his caliber of musicianship was only marginally less refined. Hence the frissons of excitement that ensued when the lyrical relic -- a track titled "Hub City’s Wild Side" -- surfaced on the internet, providing a taste of Lamar’s early days. Produced by T.Dot Fasheeze and just over two minutes long, you can listen to the Compton native’s 2008 work here.

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//IN THE MOUTH OF A GRAVEYARD//

It would seem any city's new municipal pre-req for being part of the cool kids club is to have its own self-titled art fair. Eschewing its insignificant art reputation, Seattle’s inaugural event is currently underway counting the David Zwirner and Gagosian Galleries amongst its bonafide contributors. Among dozens of featured artists, Jenny Heishman will be showing a Magritte-influenced sculpture that uses high-school-prom backgrounds and Wendy Red Star’s life-size diorama of an imagined wilderness, complete with cardboard-moose cutouts that are sure to garner attention. The Seattle Art Fair will be on until August 2.

//SOME SORT OF VIOLENT ACT//

Smiley Has No Nose is the title of Tala Madani's first solo exhibition at David Kordansky Gallery. The recurring protagonists in Madani’s work--mostly-nude bald men in adolescent form, loincloths, and compromising positions--have summoned a wide range of critique as she uses sadistic humor to offer theses behind her provocative indigenous images. The exhibit is free and ongoing so if you’re ever around Hancock Park and in the mood for some ambiguity and art with no limits, you have until August 29 to subject yourself.

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//CONNECTED TO A BUCOLIC EARTH//

Speaking of loincloths, evidence would prove that they are attire à la mode for Peru’s Mascho Piro tribe. The previously unphotographed clan were papp’d for the first time by Jean-Paul van Bell, a professor at the University of Cape Town who took the stills on a 2011 ornithology trip to the Amazon. Only just released to the public, Survival International has described the photographs as "the most detailed sightings of uncontacted Indians ever recorded on camera."

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//I FIGURED THAT ONE DAY I WOULD GET CAUGHT//

Taking Derelicte to a saddening level of real is a new documentary shadowing the life of 56 year-old model / photographer Mark Reay -- a handsome individual who mingles his way through life in NYC with the finesse of a high-flying playboy. The catch? He’s homeless, or rather Homme Less as the movie is so cleverly titled. Exposing “the underbelly of the American Dream” by way of contrasting a man adept so at socializing his way around some of the city’s most fashionable soirees with his night ending in brushing his teeth in a public restroom. Homme Less it set to open at New York’s IFC Center on August 7. See the trailer here.

//UNIMAGINABLY MORE DANGEROUS//

Torch-carrying Riot Grrrls to the front: Bikini Kill is re-issuing their demo. Set for release on September 22 is Revolution Girl Style Now, the punk band’s premiere collection of work that was recorded the day after one of their very first shows and self-released in May of 1991. If jamming to classics like “Suck My Left One” and “Double Dare Ya” is enough to get you to finally flip the bird to your cat-callers, hopefully the fact that the tape also includes three previously unreleased tracks (“Ocean Song”, “Just Once”, and “Playground”) is enough to have us all poised for a revolution--or should we say, Revolution Girl Style Now.

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//MY E-METER IS ON THE FRITZ//

As Tom Cruise gears up for his 25th year as a pivotal member of The Church of Scientology. sculptor Daniel Edwards has taken it upon himself to recognize the actor’s silver jubilee in a fittingly bizarre manner. The intriguing development, taken from a recent press release, will include a massive 14-foot shroud of Cruise and his apparently not-so-indistinct package alongside a series of Cruise-related commemorative silver medals available from Cory Allen Contemporary Art. The sculptor has become notorious for his less-than flattering works of celebrity matter that include a life size sculpture of Britney Spears giving birth.

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//EVEN THE MOST PROGRESSIVE ORGANS//

It’s time to examine the matrices of matriarchy. Let Power Take a Female Form is an exhibition that features Eugenia Butler, Eugenia P. Butler (Jr), and Corazon de Sol--three generations of women in the same family, each deeply embedded in the Los Angeles art scene. They have a common narrative of trauma, bonds, and womanhood, in their own unique forms of expression shown in this experimental gallery exhibit. From installations of a honey-soaked sheet covered in dead flies to a video game of three-legged creatures navigating through the universe with genitalia encounters in cosmic space, it’s obvious that there is much here to be absorbed. The Box LA will be hosting weekly gallery potlucks every Thursday until August 8 to discuss the show over food, which, to us, sounds just about as magical as flying vaginas (also featured).

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//MY INTENTIONS ARE GOOD//

Well, well, well, if there was anyone we’d question taking cues on decorum and philanthropy from, corporate banking groups would be it. Nevertheless, Citibank is casting aspersions aside as they implement a novel approach to retaining the spawn of their most affluent clients. Playing host to a cultural bootcamp of sorts, the banking giant is corralling a select group of youngsters to attend week-long summits that cover subjects of shrewd art-buying, philanthropy and cultural awareness.

Edited by Madeline Saxton-Beer and Katie Gavin

Contributors: Irene Kim, Michael Esguerra

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