Marilyn Manson

by Matthew Bedard

One Day, You’ll Be Up for a Promotion, and the Entertainer Will Likely Deny It
It is with great pleasure that we welcome you to your new post. You’ll be sat in row 17, column 24, next to rock star Marilyn Manson. Please note that your cuticles are to be kept clean, your trousers starched, and your fear of the criminally savory upheld. After clocking in, you’ll assess the surroundings and determine whom you’re to service that day. This is not typical workplace etiquette, but it’s how we function. Let’s say that diabolical workhorse—the publisher across the way—is screaming into a phone and you notice those screams gaining pitch, even though the content of it does not necessitate elevation. It’s because his hearing aids, or earpieces, need battery replacement. Replace them. As you grow in the company, you’ll learn to anticipate these things before they happen. It’s called elbow grease. If, for instance, that director of garb in 22, 13 happens upon you near the water cooler, it’s best you not leave too grubby of a mark on the lever, for she’ll not only require an extra set of antiseptic gloves to use said fountain, but she’ll publicly goad you for the grubby marks with a pegboard posting in the cafeteria, which will only result in low self-esteem and a demotion. Anticipate her water breaks. Now, should you happen to so much as look at Marilyn Manson, you stand grounds for termination. Why? Because Marilyn Manson is a contemporary artist who’s occupied a space in culture that is uneclipsable, really. You can only eye an eclipse through one of those special refractive deals and we take those away upon entry, anyway, so forget it. But you’re still sitting next to Marilyn Manson, which is cool, so you can tell your friends. They may have seen Marilyn Manson’s artwork before—pained, erotic, poetic, engorged watercolors—often portraiture that seems to bleed internally to a point of near combustion, yet restraint prevails. Combustion and restraint. It’s those very ingredients that compelled Hedi Slimane to feature him in the Saint Laurent campaign last F/W. It’s what sees him as white supremacist prison head, Ron Tully, on the wildly successful Sons of Anarchy. It’s what has him performing blood-letting rituals on Melrose and Curson (rumored), a favorite of Nietzsche, the latest of Flaunt’s cover artists, and the highest paid, highest performing employee in the company. So shut your mouth, anticipate, stare straight ahead, and behold what Marilyn Manson had to say for his entry interview.

What to you, Marilyn Manson, defines the grind as it pertains to modern work culture? Well it could be a knife, drugs, sex (like Grindr). For me it’s about the spokes and the wheels and the chains. And sharpening your teeth so you stay at the top of the food chain. And train..

Considering your role on Sons of Anarchy, what has surprised you about the acting medium as an art form? It lets me utilize my multiple personalities. And I get to fall into a world that’s different than my own. It’s like a ghost inside you once you open up the idea to being a moving painting that talks.

What do you truly despise in people? Lack of ambition. Ignorance.

Is Big Data to be feared? I have no more fear. Especially of data. I’m dada.

If there is a consummate emotion that occurs within you while painting, what is it? If not, and you had to make one up, what would it be and why? I am probably devoid of emotion while painting. It’s my secret place. The unconscious mind holds my subconscious by the wrist while my conscious hand stains the paper. Horrors and pretty orphans of whatever hides in my soul leak out. After I see it dry, it causes emotions manifested differently by anyone who sees it. Art is never one thing.