Andy Gillet Discusses the Opportunities That Come From Dropping Out

by Emily Nimptsch

“Perfection is boring! That would be the French idea of beauty. I have the feeling that Americans are looking for perfection in beauty; as a result everything looks
a bit fake and flat. In France, beauty arrives suddenly from the imperfection.”
“To attain joie de vivre, you have to kill efficiency,” fashion model and screen star Andy Gillet admits while expounding on the renowned French vivacity. As a performer and student of human nature, Gillet masterfully captures this simple, yet fundamental gaiety. He explains that in order to fully comprehend French film and culture, “You have to be able to stay hours sitting on a terrace, drinking wine, smoking cigarettes, and talking about love. Efficiency is just something useful in work to be able to work less.”

This seemingly effortless balance between the pursuit of leisure and passion for artistic craft is where Gillet and his fellow compatriots seem to have most of life’s important issues figured out. Once a promising business student, Gillet left school to attempt a career in the dramatic arts. He soon began modeling and taking acting classes. “I always wanted to be an actor, and I have worked to do so,” he says, reflecting on that momentous decision in his life. “The business school was a compromise to get an insurance in life to please my parents! I hated it and leaving it was a relief!”

The courage to drop out has paid dividends. Over the past decade, Gilllet has made a name for himself delivering nuanced performances in such diverse films as 2014’s military dramedy Fort Buchanan, Korean romantic comedy Antique (2008), and he will appear in the upcoming French production The Misfortunes of Francois Jane, a five-part tableaux detailing the eponymous character’s obsession with a woman. In each role, Gillet supplies and wrestles with vivid emotions while maintaining authenticity. This ideal is also crucial in modeling; Gillet’s other gig.

In his couture print work, Gillet radiates elegance, glamour, and charm. When asked about the difference between the French and American fashion worlds, he proclaims that, “Perfection is boring! That would be the French idea of beauty. I have the feeling that Americans are looking for perfection in beauty; as a result everything looks a bit fake and flat. In France, beauty arrives suddenly from the imperfection.”

Photographer: Fe Pinheiro.

Stylist: Henry de Castillon.

Talent: Andy Gillet for Next Management, Paris.

Hair & Makeup: Maniasha for B Agency.

Assistant Stylist: Cindy Leveziel.

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