Disclosure

by E. Ryan Ellis

The Sibling Saviors of House?
Like Romulus and Remus suckling at the teat of their wolf-mother, the golden sprouts born of the ’90s fed on the meat of technology once their paws hit land.

The brothers Lawrence, now known to the world as Disclosure, fit the bill of these high-intake ’90s babies. Recently they’ve been lighting up the U.K. airwaves with the master strokes of their album: the bulbous, sermonizing “When A Fire Starts To Burn” and “Latch” led by the intonations of crooner, Sam Smith. With the hallow onset of dubstep, there needed to be swift reaction from purveyors of dance-house. Disclosure may just be the answer.

And now, for the sake of celebrating all that’s born from need, poignant lines from underappreciated ’80s film Electric Dreams, in which a man and his computer fight for the affections of a woman backed by the soundtrack of synthesizing mastermind Giorgio Moroder:

Miles Harding: “You can play it for her, you can play it for me.”

Edgar: What?

Miles Harding: Play it, Sam.

Edgar: What key?

Miles Harding: Your favorite.

Edgar: You want verses first, or the choruses?

Miles Harding: Any way you like.