Hauser & Wirth Showcases Powerhouse Trio

by Leslie Gonzalez

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Where there is rebellion, there is art. Los Angeles based Hauser & Wirth have always been dynamic in their presentations of exhibits and artists, constantly expanding their reputation to help artists execute their visionary projects worldwide. They continue to do so with their current exhibitions showing off powerhouse artists Mark Bradford, Geta Brătescu, and Louise Bourgeois.

 Mark Bradford. "Tonight.... we feed!" (2018). Mixed media on canvas. 152.4 x 121.9 cm / 60 x 48 in

Mark Bradford. "Tonight.... we feed!" (2018). Mixed media on canvas. 152.4 x 121.9 cm / 60 x 48 in

Open from February 17th- May 20th, the exhibition showcases work representing—if not commenting—on the social and political strife dominating the artist's pasts, and, in Bradford's case, straight off of an inflammatory and rapturous exhibition at the Venice Bienalle, the current political and cultural climate. Bradford continues his critique on hidden networks that often fragment and wound our country while celebrating life in all its wildness. His New Works dip in to the cultural zeitgeist and his own past, using a variety of materials to execute his unique vision.

 Geta Brătescu. “Desen cu ochii închiși (Drawing with Eyes Closed)” (2003-2008). Marker pen and graphite on paper, in 9 parts Each: 21 x 29 cm / 8 1/4 x 11 3/8 in.

Geta Brătescu. “Desen cu ochii închiși (Drawing with Eyes Closed)” (2003-2008). Marker pen and graphite on paper, in 9 parts Each: 21 x 29 cm / 8 1/4 x 11 3/8 in.

Geta Brătescu's solo exhibit The Leaps of Aesop flaunts satire, using the Greek fabulist as a tool to subvert totalitarianism, authority, and status, all with her iconic sense of humor and joy. Her exhibition will comprise a series of drawings, collages, engravings, textiles and photography incorporating experimental film, video, and performance. Her exhibition project themes of identity, gender, and dematerialization, invoking literary figures and their relationship between art and their working environment.

And finally, even though Louise Bourgeois was laid to rest in 2010, she continues to influence the art world now, more than ever. Bourgeois's final works, titled The Red Sky, created near the end of her life, examine one magnificent woman’s past and painful present, searching for redemption and focusing on the central themes of memory, trauma, nature, and the failing of the body in age. 

 Louise Bourgeois. "Have a Little Courage" (2009). Watercolor, ink, gouache, colored pencil, pencil, fabric, etching on paper, 4 panels approx. 186.4 x 223.5-358 cm / 73 3/8  x 88-141 in each (framed)

Louise Bourgeois. "Have a Little Courage" (2009). Watercolor, ink, gouache, colored pencil, pencil, fabric, etching on paper, 4 panels approx. 186.4 x 223.5-358 cm / 73 3/8  x 88-141 in each (framed)

All told, it's an unmissable chance to see three brilliant artists in peak form, and all for free. Head over and fuel yourself for the resistance.


Written by Leslie Gonzalez

All imagery courtesy Hauser & Wirth