Robotripping: Palaces

by flaunt

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Robotripping: Palaces

Here We Are...

*In the garden of the great palace there is a mountain on which there is another palace, and it is the finest and richest one could imagine

*All the walls are covered with red skins that are from animals called pacies

*These skins are as red as blood, and so shiny in the sun that one can barely look at them.

* In the middle of the palace there is a raised platform that is adorned everywhere with gold and precious stones and large pearls

*All around there are large gold nets, and cloths made of silk and gold hang everywhere from this platform

*At the head of the hall is the emperor’s throne which is made of fine precious stones bordered all around with fine gold

*The steps to the platform are all made of different precious stones and set in gold.

*The emperor has his table all to himself that is made of gold and precious stones and white or yellow crystal bordered with gold and stones-

*Whether with amethyst, or with lignum aloes, which comes from Paradise, or with ivory set in and bordered with gold.

*At great feasts, gold tables are brought in with gold peacocks or other kinds of birds all made of gold and enameled and very nobly wrought-

*And they are made to dance and flutter and beat their wings, and great tricks are done with them

*All the vessels with which food is served in his halls and his rooms are made of precious stones

*All their goblets are of emeralds and sapphires, of topazes, peridots, and many other stones.

*They do not value silver enough to make vessels from it, but they use it to make steps and pillars and paved floors in the halls and rooms.

All excerpts from The Book of John Mandeville - Chapter 23 (About the Great Chan of Cathay. About the Royal Dignity of His Palace. And How He Sits to Eat and About the Large Number of Servants Who Serve Him) Edited and translated by Iain Macleod Higgins, Hackett Publishing, 2011 First appeared ca. 1357