Loris Gréaud: The French Artist’s One-At-A-Time Film Project Opens At LACMA

by flaunt

Still fromLoris Gréaud: Sculpt. Courtesy the Artist and LACMA, Los Angeles.

Loris Gréaud: The French Artist’s One-At-A-Time Film Project Opens At LACMA

"I always had in mind that this will take place a few kilometers from Hollywood studios. I’m trying to include my ‘film’ in a global gesture in the collective imagination of the film industry.”

A filmmaker, architect, and installation artist, Loris Gréaud is one of the most highly acclaimed French contemporary artists. Amongst his other honors, Gréaud was the first person to ever have a joint exhibition between the Louvre and the Centre Pompidou. His new piece, Loris Gréaud: Sculpt—an avant-garde film project viewable by only one person at a time—is currently on display at LACMA.

Gréaud spoke to us about the project, and shared stills from Sculpt.

On the evolution of film:

“I don’t think there is a true evolution of film. It’s actually quite conservative paradoxically—same as the art world. Trying to question the way it functions often produces the same result: a film. Zero-Sum Game.”

On site-specificity:

“The project has been made specifically for LACMA—even if it goes beyond the museum space. I always had in mind that this will take place a few kilometers from Hollywood studios. I’m trying to include my ‘film’ in a global gesture in the collective imagination of the film industry.”

On the element of fantasy in art:

“Art shouldn’t shape fantasy. Good art is certainly blurring [fantasy] with everything else, potentially making it porous to other feelings, gender, reality, time, forms, and so on.

On the role of art in interpreting femininity:

“I’m thinking of this J.G. Ballard quote from Rushing to Paradise [1994]: ‘Perhaps the future belongs to magic, and it’s we women who control magic.’ I personally don’t believe that art should or could change anything.”

TAGS